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Posts Tagged ‘refuge’

  • A Lesson in Covering Up

    2nd July 12

    Posted by Jeremy Ettinghausen

    Posted in online video

    Authors: Claire Coady, Social Media Manager and Simon Robertson, Strategist, BBH London

    Want to find out how to get a great look under even the most trying of conditions? Let YouTube celebrity and makeup artist Lauren Luke show you how in this helpful tutorial:

    YouTube Preview Image

    If that wasn’t quite what you were expecting, you’ll know what Lauren’s many followers and their friends will be experiencing over the coming days, as a result of our partnership with Lauren and domestic abuse charity Refuge.  It’s a very different approach for a charity, but it’s one that we think is vital to help them adapt to a very different type of audience, and a different type of public conversation.

    The world is noisy. Everyone has something to say. But there are some things people just don’t want to talk about. And in a media landscape catering to our individual needs, people don’t have to talk or hear about things they don’t want to.

    People don’t want to talk about domestic abuse.

    MORE THAN JUST AN AWARENESS ISSUE

    When society doesn’t talk about the big important problems, particularly the ones that may cause fear or discomfort, a vacuum of knowledge inevitably forms, quickly filled with misinformation.

    People think that everyone “gets” what domestic abuse is. They’re wrong. Research shows that more than half of teenage girls aged 13-18 have experienced sexual violence at the hands of a partner – and considered it normal. 40% of teenage girls would consider giving a boyfriend a second chance if he hit them. A third believe that cheating justifies the use of violence.

    By not loudly and continuously reinforcing that domestic abuse is a problem, society sends a message that it isn’t serious.  By ignoring the issue, it is normalised, and creates a generation of  potential victims.

    In a very real sense, silence kills. Two women in the UK die at the hands of an abusive partner or ex-partner every week. Talking saves lives.

    That’s why Refuge’s call to action is “speak up, save a life”.  But speaking to teenage girls requires a different type of speaking up: one tailored to a fragmented media landscape, a group focussed on entertainment rather than weightier issues, and a subject that discourages discussion.

    A CASE FOR SUBVERSION

    A traditional disruptive approach wasn’t going to work. But we knew our audience wouldn’t come to use through choice. Our response has been to create a piece of communication directly tailored to the way that teen girls consume and communicate information. That encourages them to become part of the conversation on their terms. Not disruption of their experience, so much as a subversion of it.

    We knew we’d have to sneak our message into an existing channel that our audience were already interested in in a way that created maximum impact. Considering the role of subversion of expectation in viral spread – viral activity often takes the form of practical joking – we realised that the more that we could increase that sense of contrast between expectation and content, the higher the likelihood of spread.

    And we wanted to make sharing and commentary the call to action, because sharing is how teens conduct public debate.  It allows them to make a stand without exposing their own opinions and be part of something with a low risk of emotional or social damage. Viral behaviour is their version of the town square, the salon or the pub.

    SERIOUSLY UNFUNNY

    In effect, we were creating a practical joke with a purpose that couldn’t have been more serious: shocking people out of their complacency around domestic abuse, and allowing them to take a stand against it on their terms.

    What we needed to do was find a Trojan horse who would carry our message to young women. That was where Lauren Luke came in.


    Lauren’s relationship with her audience is paramount; every content decision and direction she makes is with her subscribers in mind. Her enthusiasm for the cause and participation in shocking her fans is, in short, the kind of unstinting bravery needed to tackle domestic violence as a subject.

    The film itself has been deliberately designed to maximise the shock of the contrast between the context and content: particularly Lauren’s chirpy demeanour contrasting with her appearance. But this wasn’t about forcing a scripted film into a social channel. We provided a general framework and direction for Lauren and allowed her the space and time to make the film her own: a challenge she rose to brilliantly.

    We then wanted to make sure the content was framed in a way that maximised the stunt aspect: the copy that appears alongside the film wherever it is shared is intended to draw people in without ever giving an indication of the content.

    Finally, our call to action is the most simple and natural one that our audience know:  share. And by sharing, speak out.

    Credits

    Copywriter: Jack Smedley

    Art Director: George Hackforth

    Art Director: Stephen Noble

    Film directed by: Wesley Hawes and Gary McCreadie

    Creative DirectorPablo Marques

    Strategists: Claire Coady & Simon Robertson

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