2 el palet raf raf sistemleri evden eve nakliyat evden eve nakliyat
eskort bayan
  • jeux gratuits
  • Archive for the ‘process’ Category

    • Think While You Make, Make While You Think

      14th January 11

      Posted by Mel Exon

      Posted in People, process

      “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.”
      ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Crack-Up (1936)

      Photo: Balance, by LN

      At the end of last year, I briefly questioned our fascination with making things. For some reason, I was feeling uneasy. A flurry of conversation on Twitter ensued and later our friend @willsh followed up with a post of his own reflecting anew on the topic.

      Just so we’re clear, we’re big advocates of making and experimenting, not just talking or thinking. And if we’re even half-coping with the maelstrom of change out there, it’s because we’re getting comfortable with the idea of perpetual learning. That may sound hideously exhausting, but it’s responsible for keeping us sane: it’s a blessed relief when you realise your job is to act on patterns and opportunities as they warp and wend around you, instead of sending yourself quietly mad searching for a linear, tried and tested path to knowledge.

      And yet.. we need to stop and draw breath from time to time. There are a few reasons for this, some of which, sure, we’re all familiar with:

      Read full post
    • How to do Propagation Planning

      13th October 10

      A few years ago I wanted to be a part of the next theory in strategic planning. Connections Planning had been around for about ten years (in 2009) and I wanted to know what comes next? That’s when I discovered the work that Ivan Pollard from Naked Communications had shared around Propagation Planning.

      Over the last few years I dedicated my ‘extra’ time to understanding and cultivating the theory, articles and case studies surrounding propagation planning. I shared everything I learned on my Blog. By sharing, others contributed and the ideas got better.

      Sharing and generosity are very important in the advertising industry today. They make all of us better. As they say, “a rising tide lifts all boats.”

      Edward Boches, who is in the process of formalizing propagation planning at Mullen, wrote a great post this week asking a provocative question, “Do you give content away because you want credit?” For me, I give content away to become a member of the club. A club of strategic planning minds that contribute everyday to a greater collective. This club is made up of so many people that I couldn’t possibly name them all here… but you know who you are.

      So I was thrilled when Mark Lewis and the Planning-Ness conference asked if Mike Monello (Co-Founder at Campfire) and I would share our thoughts on propagation planning. I hope that you can take something away from this deck and inspire your creative and social media teams to develop work that gets spread.

      (Best viewed by clicking MENU and FULL SCREEN)

    • “Yes. But….”: Challenging Short-hand Marketing Rules

      7th October 10

      Posted by Saneel Radia

      Posted in creativity, digital, process

      Author: Emma Cookson, Chairman BBH New York

      This bunch of charts comes from a BBH session at a recent conference organized by The Bellwether Group in New York. The subject of the day was ‘Creativity and content creation in a digital age”. So something of a wide canvas….

      My start point was the realization of how intimidated I felt speaking on the topic – and the further realization that this intimidation stemmed not just from personal neurosis or the breadth/complexity of the subject (although all that applied), but that I was also intimidated because there’s already so much great comment and advice in this area available. It’s one of the interesting by-products of an age of such extraordinary pace of change that we’re all frantically trying to keep learning, keep up to date, keep pace – and as a result there’s a whole slew of people working to satisfy that desire with tips and advice. Every day brings a deluge of advice and input on digital marketing/comms/business-building.

      My observation is that although so much of this advice and comment is truly fantastic, the flip-side is that within all the rush and deluge we are sometimes accepting and sharing – at speed and at face-value – assertions that maybe should bear closer examination and qualification. Perhaps all these assertions we read in the latest expert tweet or in the headline of that skimmed article are all broadly right – but maybe not in all circumstances, not right for all brands, not right in every dimension. Perhaps there’s a slightly more precise story to tell (see our recent post on a similar theme examining participation).

      So that’s where this presentation came from. And why it’s called ‘Yes. But…’ I note a number widely accepted truths about creative best practice in a digital age – and, without disagreeing with any of them, suggest that they might benefit from a little qualification. My contention is that – for example – escalating consumer control of brands is of course a real phenomenon, but it doesn’t absolve brand owners of deep responsibility for brand leadership and, yes, still a degree of brand control. Or that ’360 degree marketing’ is a good clarion call, until you start wondering if it really is right that the most powerful communication solutions really do always have to be deployable in every single channel, with every weapon available in our communication arsenal.

      Any comment or argument is greatly appreciated.



    • How the CIA define problems & plan solutions: The Phoenix Checklist

      1st June 10

      Posted by Ben Malbon

      Posted in awesomeness, process

      ciaseal

      In a recent BBH Labs post (Wind Tunnel Marketing, The Sequel: On the Need for Divergent Insight) that talked about the need for divergent thinking and stimulus in approaching problem solving (& creative ideation), Chaz Wigley, the Chairman of BBH in Asia Pacific, mentioned how the CIA‘s (I’ve always wanted to link to the CIA) Problem Definition Checklist provoked precisely this kind of approach; rounded, many-faceted, flexible.

      These questions are known as “context-free questions” and are designed “to encourage agents to look at a challenge from many different angles. Using Phoenix is like holding your challenge in your hand. You can turn it, look at it from underneath, see it from one view, hold it up to another position, imagine solutions, and really be in control of it” (see the excellent, if chewy, paper on Exploring Exploratory Testing, for more here).

      We now have from Chaz not only the list of questions the CIA use to define problems, but also (thanks to Iqbal Mohammed) the follow-up list they use to develop the plan. Which seems kind of important too.

      My personal favourite question in the problem definition list is the somewhat open-ended: ‘what isn’t the problem?’.

      Enjoy.

      THE PROBLEM

      Why is it necessary to solve the problem?
      What benefits will you receive by solving the problem?
      What is the unknown?
      What is it you don’t yet understand?
      What is the information you have?
      What isn’t the problem?
      Is the information sufficient? Or is it insufficient? Or redundant? Or contradictory?
      Should you draw a diagram of the problem? A figure?
      Where are the boundaries of the problem?
      Can you separate the various parts of the problem? Can you write them down? What are the relationships of the parts of the problem? What are the constants of the problem?
      Have you seen this problem before?
      Have you seen this problem in a slightly different form? Do you know a related problem?
      Try to think of a familiar problem having the same or a similar unknown
      Suppose you find a problem related to yours that has already been solved. Can you use it? Can you use its method?
      Can you restate your problem? How many different ways can you restate it? More general? More specific? Can the rules be changed?
      What are the best, worst and most probable cases you can imagine?

      THE PLAN

      Can you solve the whole problem? Part of the problem?
      What would you like the resolution to be? Can you picture it?
      How much of the unknown can you determine?
      Can you derive something useful from the information you have?
      Have you used all the information?
      Have you taken into account all essential notions in the problem?
      Can you separate the steps in the problem-solving process? Can you determine the correctness of each step?
      What creative thinking techniques can you use to generate ideas? How many different techniques?
      Can you see the result? How many different kinds of results can you see?
      How many different ways have you tried to solve the problem?
      What have others done?
      Can you intuit the solution? Can you check the result?
      What should be done? How should it be done?
      Where should it be done?
      When should it be done?
      Who should do it?
      What do you need to do at this time?
      Who will be responsible for what?
      Can you use this problem to solve some other problem?
      What is the unique set of qualities that makes this problem what it is and none other?
      What milestones can best mark your progress?
      How will you know when you are successful?

    • Less, But Better – an interview with design legend Dieter Rams

      29th June 09

      Posted by Ben Malbon

      Posted in culture, design, process

      “Good designers must always be avant-gardists, always one step ahead of the times. They should – and must – question everything generally thought to be obvious. They must have an intuition for people’s changing attitudes. For the reality in which they live, for their dreams, their desires, their worries, their needs, their living habits. They must also be able to assess realistically the opportunities and bounds of technology.”

      (Dieter Rams, 1980 speech to Braun supervisory board, from his Design Museum profile)

      There can’t be many more legendary & respected designers around today than Dieter Rams. For over 50 years Rams has been one of the most influential industrial designers around, producing elegant, stripped-down and flawlessly balanced everyday objects in such enduring forms that one is hard-pressed to identify a design of his that hasn’t stood the test of time.

      picture-6

      Electric shaver, 1970; Control ET44 calculator, 1978; LE1 loudspeaker, 1960. All Braun.

      In fact, if you own an iPod, iPhone, or iMac you almost certainly owe thanks to Dieter Rams for some of the look, feel and simplicity of these products. His influence is explicit in the work of Jonathan Ive at Apple, most literally, perhaps, in the design of the calculator on the iPhone, but in fact across almost the entire range of Apple products.

      The influence of Rams on Jonathan Ive at Apple is profound (image: Jesus Diaz)

      The influence of Rams on Jonathan Ive at Apple is profound (image: Jesus Diaz)

      (For more, including Q&A with Rams, click below)

      Read full post

    • We are the Robots!

      20th April 09

      In eager anticipation of the new Terminator film, I’ve done a little poking around into what’s happening in the world of robots.

      The main action in this area is clearly in Asia. And while Korea pushes ahead with plans to build robot parks, even going so far as to introduce legislation for a robot code of ethics to “Prevent Android Abuse and Protect Humans,” it’s the Japanese who appear to be in the quickest sprint to building a creepy robo-future.

      Due to strict immigration laws and a quickly aging population (its expected that 1/3 of its citizenry will be over 60 by 2050) the country is racing to realize a day when robots can provide care for their elderly, clean homes and provide administrative office tasks. Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry is actively involved in supporting the development of intelligent robots and hopes to introduce many of the models in development into the marketplace by 2015.

      Here’s a cross-sample of what’s in store…

      PARO
      According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Paro is the “World’s most therapeutic robot.” It uses an array of sensors to respond to audible, visual, and tactile stimulation. Each Paro attains a unique personality of sorts due to its ability to be trained to execute (or refrain from) specific actions. Pet Paro and he knows he is being rewarded for good behaviour, smack him and he will do his best not to repeat that behaviour.
      (For full post click below)

      YouTube Preview Image

      Read full post

    • How Do Creatives Think?

      17th April 09

      Posted by Ben Malbon

      Posted in creativity, process

      One of the most enduringly brilliant things about working in a creative business is that, for the most part, it remains a complete mystery as to how the creative mind actually develops thinking and ideas. Much as many have tried to bring science, objectivity and rationality to advertising and marketing over the years, most would agree that the majority of breakthrough creativity somehow seems to defy rules, not follow them. It all still seems – on balance – to be more art than science. And long may that continue (in fact, I’m trying to write something up right now on the emerging battle between art and the algorithm).

      I’ve been talking to Glenn Griffin (SMU-Dallas) and Deborah Morrison (U. Oregon) about this theme. These guys are professors who teach aspiring creatives and study creativity. Their latest project is a book that will showcase drawings of the creative process by some of the ad industry’s best, including BBH New York’s very own ECD Kevin Roddy (see his drawing, below), Alex Bogusky, David Baldwin, David Kennedy, Nancy Rice, Luke Sullivan and many others.

      picture-2

      The drawings reveal so much about each individual’s pathway to ideas and constitute a unique archive of the brain power that fuels the business. Just skimming through the early submissions from some fairly legendary creatives I was struck by both just how different they were from each other (some drawn, some cartoon, many mixing images and copy), but also how simple they were.

      The book, tentatively titled Pure Process, is set for publication in Summer 2010 by How Books. Glenn and Deborah are still looking for last-minute submissions from anyone who wants to play.

      Interested? You can contact them direct at pureprocess.thebook@pureprocess.org