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Archive for the ‘interactive’ Category

  • Introducing the “Art of the Trench”, for Burberry

    17th October 14

    Posted by Ben Malbon

    Posted in culture, interactive, social media

    Author: Fran Hazeldine, BBH London

    We’re really excited about the new platform created for Burberry by BBH London and our partners (& buddies), Made by Many.

    Art of the Trench is inspired by an iconic Burberry product: the trench coat. Commissioned by the UK War Office in 1914, the Burberry trench coat has endured as a wardrobe staple and continues to be a key business driver for the brand.

    screen-shot-2009-11-09-at-113648-am

    Over the long-term, Art of the Trench will host a series of participative projects.  The first of these projects is a social gallery featuring hundreds of trench-owner portraits, creating a living document of the trench coat and the people who wear it. Capitalising on the street style phenomenon, the launch site features a collaboration with celebrated photographer / blogger Scott Schuman – aka The Sartorialist (in fact in today’s post on his site Scott highlights a few of his favorite shots).

    As new content collaborations unfold, Art of the Trench will also release new functionality, with the platform evolving in ‘permanent beta’.

    Visitors to artofthetrench.com can explore the trench portraits on a huge interactive canvas, using filters to sort by gender, styling, weather and popularity – a simple combination of ‘art and the algorithm‘, to use a BBH Labs catchphrase. Visitors can then add comments and rate images, as well as creating a profile and making their own collections. Finally, trench-owning visitors are invited to submit their own trench portraits. Burberry Creative Director Christopher Bailey will hand-pick the very best to be curated on the site.

    The platform integrates with Facebook, allowing Burberry’s 700 000 fans to simply ‘connect’ with and import their Facebook profile rather than creating yet another new profile. When on the site, users can choose to share content, links and activity from Art of the Trench across their Facebook and Twitter networks. Whilst most Luxury brands have been slow to exploit the social web, Burberry – with the Live show streaming event and now Art of the Trench – continues to show that a luxury brand can use social media to be simultaneously exclusive and accessible.

    Whilst the initial photographer collaborations focus on the contemporary world of the trench, future Art of the Trench projects will also explore Burberry’s rich heritage. At launch, a stunning interactive timeline will allow users to explore a multimedia exhibition of trench coats and related archive content from across the decades.

    Art of the Trench was conceived, designed and developed using an integrated agile approach. The combined BBH, Made by Many and Burberry project team adopted agile xnx working practices that integrated BBH’s Engagement Planning and Content disciplines with Made by Many’s Service / Interaction Design and Technology capabilities, and Burberry’s growing internal digital team.

    In terms of technology, Art of the Trench successfully combines an open source (Ruby on Rails) back-end with a very rich Flash interface. Only a handful of services have so far integrated Facebook Connect into a Flash application of this complexity. The project has taken 16 weeks to develop from a standing start. Development took place in six, two-week iterations.

    If you’d like to be one of the first users to browse the site, leave a comment or submit a trench portrait, please take a few minutes to explore the site today. On a more prosaic note, let us know if you come across any bugs – we’ll be updating with minor bug fixes later this week.

    http://artofthetrench.com/

  • BBH went to SXSW and this is what we found

    11th April 14

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in Events, interactive

    Author: Ben Shaw, Social Strategy Lead, BBH London

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    Last month, BBH London sent 11 lucky people to Austin to discover the latest innovations that tech, film and music had to offer. Amongst the BBQ, beer and banter, they managed to find a bunch of insights about the advancement of the human race. Topics like this may only truly be delivered under a desert sky with smoked meat and a pale ale, but in an effort to distribute our learnings to a wider audience we’ve tried to distil them down into some slides (below). We looked at three topics that we think are vital to our future – as an agency and as human beings. Enjoy.

    TECHNOLOGY
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    CREATIVITY
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    PEOPLE
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  • Global Internet Trends of 2012

    10th December 12

    Photo: Mary Meeker, KPCB

    KPCB Internet Trends 2012

    We at BBH Labs are big fans of Mary Meeker. Every year we like to republish her Internet Trends and this year is no exception. The report has changed throughout the years but the insight gets richer and more useful as time goes on. The report is just under 90 slides so for you slackers that don’t want to read the whole thing we have pulled out the information that we found most interesting for your data snacking pleasure:

    • USA has the highest internet penetration with 78%, but that still means 22% of the population is not online
    • In the US and UK, almost half of mobile subscribers are using smart phones at 48% and 45% respectively
    • An impressive 29% of US adults own a tablet or eReader, up from 2% three years ago
    • 48% of American kids want an iPad for Christmas this year, 36% want an iPad Mini

    This year we wanted to highlight a few trends and view them through the lens of Advertising. Ask a few thought provoking questions and put our own spin on some. A few of these things are good for our industry and other things will be more challenging.

    • In India, mobile internet usage has surpassed desktop internet usage. Mary Meeker’s team believes many countries will follow. As an industry we can acknowledge that desktop banner ads present a challenge to do great creative but when your space is limited to the size of mobile banner ads it becomes even more challenging.
    • They see a movement from asset-heavy to asset-light lifestyles in space, time and money. As an industry this means that less products are being purchased but it should increase the quality of products brought to market. When the product is good, the advertising is even better.
    • The average person spends 52 minutes per day in the car. As an industry we have relied on radio to reach this audience but as cars evolve in technology with touch screens, mobile and GPS navigation are we innovating to be be creative with this time and space? This medium seems ripe for innovation.
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    • The average person spends 3 hours per day in front of the television. As an industry we know that second screen adoption is growing at a tremendous rate, ad skipping is at an all time high, how do we change trends in advertising to combat other distractions to the ads we spend a majority of our time on?
  • ASOS Urban Tour: An Experiment In Shopping Culture

    16th September 11

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in Film, interactive

    Author: Lucia Komljen, Strategist, BBH London

    www.asos.com/urban-tour/

    This week saw the launch of ASOS Urban Tour – a shoppable, cultural experience in the form of an interactive platform promoting ASOS A/W 2011 menswear collection.  It invites the audience to watch some of the world’s most skilled urban musicians, dancers, designers and artist in action across the world and to explore what – and where – inspires their craft and their style. The centerpiece is a dynamic, shoppable video set in London which can be paused and explored at any point, presenting the user with more information on the dancers and enabling the purchase of their looks.

    Overall, we hope Urban Tour is an example of what can be achieved when you push technology and design in an attempt to seamlessly combine entertainment and service for e-commerce brands. Furthermore, it’s another demonstration of just how powerful it can be when technology enables ambitious creativity throughout the customer journey.

    Here’s the story behind the work so far, we’d love to hear what you think. Read full post

  • Revenge of the Microsite

    9th September 11

    Posted by Saneel Radia

    Posted in digital, interactive

    Author: Calle Sjoenell, Deputy Chief Creative Officer, BBH NY

    These are probably words that will haunt me forever, but I must write a tribute to the microsite, currently going through a Phoenix-like transformation known as the web app.

    The microsite was originally created to capture a single minded idea in one destination. So sharp and elegant in its purpose, the concept spread and made everyone visit.

    For me, it started with IKEA’s Dream Kitchen, one click and hold and I spun in a whirlwind of kitchen options. Minimal input, maximum output, the product at the dead center of the idea. And it sold truckloads if kitchens.

    But as with all great ideas, there where thousands of bad executions, wasting clients’ money with little to show in scale or engagement as a result.

    Then, of course, marketers had to make a rule about it. We can only build things where the audience is already hanging out. “Fish where the fish are,” and all that. This is in fact a worse sin: creating a blanket rule that microsites don’t work. It’s like saying investing in Internet companies doesn’t work.

    This is why I’m musing over the next marketer and publisher obsession on the Internet: the web app. The functionality of HTML5 and its related technology brings us out of the tyranny of page to page style navigation on the web. We will probably laugh at our text and picture based catalogue websites in a few years, a world where each step took 10-15 seconds of mental processing to solve. The web app brings single minded functionality with new interactive capabilities. Just look at the web app versions of Tweetdeck, NY Times and Angry Birds and you see the potential. Eerily like a microsite.

    But we can never forget the cardinal rule of communication that now rules all media channels, even TV.

    If you make something great, they will come (or watch). Otherwise, they won’t.

    Damn, did I just make a blanket rule?

    Long live the microsite.

  • Working Nights for Bragging Rights

    20th July 11

    Posted by Jeremy Ettinghausen

    Posted in interactive

    Author: Priyanka Kanse, Strategist, BBH London


    If you are under 11 you might be aware that Fruit Shoot launched something very cool last week. If you’re not, here is the story of Champion of the Playground:

    http://www.vimeo.com/26663730

    The work we’ve been doing with skills for the last couple of years meant that the Fruit Shoot brand was in good health, but this wasn’t transferring to success at the checkout: our core target audience (8-10 year olds) were turned off by the younger kids coming into the brand and didn’t want to be seen drinking the product.

    Our solution wasn’t a big ad campaign, but a branded gaming platform which merges the virtual world with the real world and recognises the importance of competition and challenge for 8-11 year olds.

    One of the very first pieces of paper that the creative team wrote were the principles of Champion of the Playground (below). It’s really nice to sit down at the end of phase 1 and think that the site is still true those original principles.

    What we’ve learnt

    Much of the commentary about participation platforms seems like common sense, but how the hell do I implement it? We’re learning all the time and there is so much we could say about this project, but these are some of our most interesting findings:

    User first:

    Measure every decision you make against what your user will find compelling. I’m not always a massive fan of research for traditional advertising, but for Champion of the Playground it was essential. One, we’re not 9-year-olds and two, the project lives or dies by its ability to engage.

    The first response by kids to the initial ideas was ‘but how do you stop other people from cheating?’, which meant without unique codes that encrypted the Skills Kit scores, the idea would be fundamentally undermined. We were told that we’d have to wait over a year to get kit with codes, which didn’t really fit with our delivery date, but our Creative Technology wizards worked directly with suppliers  to program boards and test prototype equipment.

    I also now have a favourite ever research moment:  In user-testing with a site prototype one of the kids was asked if they would play the game. His response? “Yeah, but they have to advertise it on TV so I know about it” – so well trained!

    Picking the right battles:

    Not that we had lots of fights, but it’s really hard to pick what to invest development time, brainpower and cash into when all the features look so darn good. And sometimes the most important details are the ones that you can’t see. We bought a games designer in to fix the games and reward logic so that the game felt fair. Just writing that sentence makes it sound simple, but it’s such a delicate balance to achieve and so crucial to the playability.

    Being able to win trophies, badges and cool stuff for your avatar is a reason to play even if you can’t be the overall winner

    And finally

    For us, Champion of the Playground is a great example of how a brief doesn’t have to be answered by traditional advertising solutions. Why do we expect our audience to spend time with us if we’re not entertaining? By creating a game which is inextricably tied up with kids’ personal progress, we are giving them something that they genuinely want to participate in.

    When you create an idea that isn’t a campaign, you naturally earn the right to exist for a longer time and in different formats. The initial response to Champion of the Playground from kids has been enthusiastic, which means that we get to keep creating and keep evolving. So keep an eye on FruitShoot.com, because we have some exciting things planned.

    Credits (names in bold might as well get COTP tattoos, such has been their dedication to the cause)

    Clients: Nadia Moussa & Debbie Eddy

    Creative team: Simon Pearse & Emmanuel Saint M’Leux

    Creative directors: Rosie Bardales, Jeremy Ettinghausen

    Digital producer: Susan Liu

    Technical director: Jim Hunt

    Head of Creative Technology: Jon Andrews

    User Experience: Ricky Faria

    Account team: Ngaio Pardon, Alex Monger, Anna Halliday

    Strategist: Priyanka Kanse

    Strategic Business Lead:  Nina Rahmatallah

    Production Company: Unit 9

    Game consultant: James Sheahan, Metagames [http://metagames.co.uk/]

    Below the line agency: The Marketing Store

  • The future of connected TV (and why it may just revolutionise adland), Part II

    17th June 11

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in interactive, technology

    Don at work by abbey*christine, via Flickr

    Author: Matthew Kershaw, Content Director, BBH London

    I talked here yesterday about a near future in which TV advertising would become fully targetted, completely measurable and highly interactive.

    So what are the implications of this prediction for agencies?

    Without getting all Harold Camping on you, here are five things I believe agencies should do to craft the advertising of the future: Read full post

  • The future of connected TV (and why it may just revolutionise adland), Part I

    16th June 11

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in interactive, technology

    TV stencil by USB, via Flickr

    Author: Matthew Kershaw (@mattski2000), Content Director, BBH London

    There is a frothy bubble of excitement growing around the future of Connected TV.

    At CES back in January, it was announced that the connected TV category is forecast to ship over 123 million connected TVs  a year by 2014. With overall ownership to reach 1 billion by 2015.

    Just this month,  Philips announced that they have 1 million active Net TV users.

    And all the major players are piling in: Google are still behind Google TV, YouView are finally preparing to launch with the ultimate boss, Lord Sugar, Virgin have just launched their Tivo service, Sony made a commitment early and even Apple are still just about in the game with their AppleTV device. And then there’s Anthony Rose, the genius behind the  BBC iPlayer and ex CTO of YouView, now championing two-screen interaction.

    With all this hype and excitement, you’d think that us ad folk would be talking about nothing else, combining as it does ad land’s two big obsessions: the power of television and the interactivity of the internet.

    So why are we holding back? Read full post

  • The Power And Perils Of Participation

    18th September 10

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in interactive, social media

    This post was originally written for the Likeminds blog. More about them here, and check out their Creativity and Curation event down in Exeter, UK, 28/29th October.

    Ulysses & The Sirens by Herbert Draper

    Don’t get me wrong. We’ve argued long and hard here in favour of brands embracing new behaviours if they’re to drive real cultural and commercial impact. To invite participation; to get out there and allow their customers in. And in terms of audience appetite for this, we’ve even gone as far as to question whether Jakob Nielsen’s 90:9:1 rule – that states the vast majority of visitors to any website are only there to lurk – will hold water for much longer in this post last year.

    We’re going to continue arguing the case for new behaviour, not against. Nonetheless, there have been a couple of instances that have given us pause for thought recently. Read full post

  • A Radical Proposal to Save Advertising on the Web

    8th September 10

    Posted by Ben Malbon

    Posted in creativity, interactive

    Author: Calle Sjoenell, Executive Creative Director, BBH New York

    (Follow Calle here: @callesjonell)

    After reading Chris Anderson’s piece in Wired about the web being dead, long live the Internet, I got a really uneasy feeling. Banner advertising has always been the weird step child of advertising. Few creatives wants to do them, clients don’t know how to approach it and nobody clicks on the ads. I always argued that it’s the ultimate test of stripped-down creativity, with lots of constraints, just 40K to play with and super-restricted space. It’s like creating wonderful music out of an old synth; just a few dials, but turn the right ones at the right time and wonderful things happen. On occasion, that can happen with banners. But maybe we have all missed the real problem. The first trouble with display ads is that people don’t know how to look at them. I believe the reason for this is the creative and the instruction for interacting with the creative is all over the place.

    Right now, internet display advertising is like driving through different towns where every town has invented their own traffic sign system. You need to look really carefully at every sign and interpret what they mean instead of brainstem reactions that would come with a unified signage system. Learn more, Click here, Fold There, plus signs, single arrows, >>, all in a box, or not. Underlined. Bold. !!!!

    We are just not sure what to do. So, in over 99% of instances, we do absolutely nothing at all.

    This is connected to a second problem with display advertising: that there is no clear way of knowing if you will leave the site or interact where you are. In the early days it made sense that you left the site you were on and went to the advertisers’ websites. That was how you used the web back then, hence the idea of ‘surfing’. Now people are on fewer and fewer sites and are reluctant to leave where they are. They’re also afraid of viruses and malware.

    Is there a solution? I propose we separate creative from instruction.

    I propose we create a clear set of universal instructions letting users know if they are staying on a site or leaving it. Or, to push it even further, what if every ad had two standard buttons at the same location, “Save for Later” (like Instapaper for display) and “Go to Website”. That way ads would behave more like we use the web today. A Universal System for display, in which everyone knows what to expect. A system that respects the user.

    Few have got this right to date. Google come to mind, with their Adwords text ads (& look at the impact of a user-focused design approach on their revenues). With Google, the parameters are tight and everyone knows what to expect. Facebook is also on to this with their standardized format that provides a redtube static picture and lots of text. These are fairly low on the creative side, but I think the creative part of a banner can be wonderfully executed through animation, API interaction or just a plain old static picture that says it all. Whatever it is, the instructions should be standard, simple and clear.

    This is one reason why I have joined the IAB and their Rising Stars forum, to drive forward this question of standardization. It might point to the way forward for creative AND functional display ads on the web that users know how to interact with. But there are a lot of people who need to agree and compromise to make this happen.

    So to save advertising on the web, who is willing to come to the table?

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