escort beylikduzu genc porno latin porno

Archive for the ‘Gaming’ Category

  • Accentuate the Negative

    29th May 13

    Posted by Jeremy Ettinghausen

    Posted in Failing, Gaming

    I spent a wonderfully stimulating day at Kill Screen Magazine’s Two5Six conference recently – a chance to listen to some smart thinkers and practitioners from the independent games scene talk about their ideas, their projects and the wider gaming & cultural landscape.

    Game folk and advertising folk have much in common; their powerful interest in user/consumer motivation; the importance of design as a tool of differentiation; a shared vocabulary around community management, UX and behavioural economics; a belief that ‘problem solving’ lies at the heart of what they do.

    But an exchange at two5six did force me to consider whether there were also some fundamental differences between us – maybe even a wholly different world-view.

    I was telling the game designer next to me about my son who, aged nine, spends quite a bit of time designing and playing games on his computer. While the Labs Dad in me is keen to nurture this, I did twitch when I saw this post on his tumblr.

    Screen Shot 2013-05-29 at 10.23.44

    Two minutes after describing this common modern family issue, I saw a twitter @ message.

    This struck me as a wonderfully elegant solution to ‘a problem’, and a solution that is most unlikely to have come from an advertising mind. Our instinct is to accentuate the positive and sell the benefit. We’d have looked for an emotional product demonstration, the product being a beautiful spring day. We might have tried inventing a new game that could only be played outdoors. We might have partnered with an ice-cream firm to exchange cones for game cartridges. But creating ‘more fail’ when the sun shines brightly? An idea that could only come from the delightfully twisted mind of a game developer.

    There’s lots to learn from gamer types. They know UX, they know behavioural economics, they know problem solving. But most of all they understand failure in all its glory. Its power to motivate and drive behaviour. Its ability to throw into relief even the smallest triumphs. That overcoming a thousand tiny failures sometimes beats a single big win. That perhaps fail alone can get a young gamer out of the living room on a sunny day.

  • Fuel for Little Gamers

    29th September 11

    Posted by Jeremy Ettinghausen

    Posted in digital, Gaming

    Author: Pablo Marques (@pablo_marques), Creative Director, BBH London & BBH Labs

    YouTube Preview Image

    A few hours ago we introduced Weetakid to the world, together with his arch-enemy, Evil Eater. The game is a playful execution of Weetabix’s brand strategy and a great example of an idea as a direct solution to a clear business challenge.

    Weetabix’s boxes are making into families’ cupboards in great numbers, but they are just not making it out of there often enough.

    If we could increase the number of times the box makes it to the breakfast table we would be able to increase consumption and sales.

    So Weetakid was born to do just that. It is a game targeted at kids, especially those from 7 to 11 years old, as they are the gravitational centre of the household during the busy hours of our morning rituals.

    In the game, kids take control of Weetakid, a creature who has just seen his little world robbed of all its energy by Evil Eater, the galaxy’s villain. The game involves a quest to retrieve the items stolen by the Evil Eater which can be found through playing a number of engaging mini games.

    But Weetakid like any other kid, needs energy, especially if it is going to travel the galaxy to rebuild its world. So every morning kids will need to feed Weetakid to ensure that they both have a day full of fun and adventure.

    To feed Weetakid, players will need a box of Weetabix. And that is what makes the idea so special.

    To enable the interaction between the the product package and the game we’ve used a set of technologies more notoriously known as Augmented Reality.

    That link between box and game is a special and symbiotic one. It doesn’t get in the way of the experience, but actually enhances it. And it does it in a way that not only helps us solve our business problem but also enables us to start driving consumer behaviour to a place closer to our brand messaging, Weetabix is your fuel for big days.

    The pack has also become the place in which we are launching the game. With widespread distribution and wide readership (the back of pack is arguably one of the most read items in the household) it will be a perfect way to reach our audience and promote the game.

    A multi layered production challenge

    Weetakid, albeit a small game, was a big integrated production puzzle that involved many different disciplines. We had to create bespoke songs, write films, direct and record voice overs, create characters and animations, design a game and make a website, among other things. And we had two months to do everything.

    We had two amazing integrated producers from BBH working on it and coordinating the whole joint effort.

    As Dani Michelon (@danimichelon) our lead integrated producer on the project puts best:

    “By the time we contacted our partners we had gone a long way into the game already, we had game flowcharts, schematics and storyboards. We had a good picture of it in our heads but there was still a lot to be done to make it reality and it was humbling to see how all the people involved collaborated so well. It was great fun to work on it and see it coming to life.”

    Firstly we contacted Yum Yum London (@yumyumlondon) and worked with them to develop the characters and animations to bring our universe to life and to design the back of the Weetabix boxes.

    Secondly came Radium audio (@radiumaudioltd) to create the amazing music that players will enjoy in the game and North Kingdom (@northkingdom) to actually put the game together and code all of that magic in.

    We also engaged society46 (@society46) who designed our Weetakid website.

    And finally The Mill (@millchannel) helped us produce our trailer.

    So after many long weeks and nights we pulled the game together; an effort of epic proportions. It was a clear labour of love and the amount of fun myself and the creative team (Felipe Guimarães @think_felipe and Lambros Charalambous @creativelamb) felt borderline illegal.

    We hope you and your kids can enjoy playing it as much we enjoyed making it. Let us know what you think in the comments below.

    Full project credits

    Creative Direction: Pablo Marques (@pablo_marques) / Dominic Goldman

    Art Direction: Felipe Guimarães / Pablo Marques / Yum Yum London

    Writer: Lambros Charalambous

    Game Design: Pablo Marques / Felipe Guimarães / Lambros Charalambous

    Lead Producers: Daniela Michelon, Jo Osborne

    Strategy Director: Nina Rahmatallah

    Business Director: Nick Stringer

    Team Manager: Luke Algar

    Legal: Henry Rowan-Robinson

    Character Design / Awesomeness: Yum Yum London

    Music / Sound: Radium Audio

    Sound Producer: Sam Brock

    Game and interface programming: North Kingdom

    Trailer edit: The Mill

    Website design/production: Society 46

  • 56 Sage Street: the story behind the game

    13th August 10

    Posted by Mel Exon

    Posted in creativity, Gaming

    Author: Ali Merry, Creative, BBH London

    56 Sage Street – The Game – Game Play Video Trailer from 56 Sage Street – The Game on Vimeo.


    The first release of 56 Sage Street – BBH London & B-Reel’s game for Barclays – went live last month and, we´re happy to say, has just received NMA’s Campaign of the Month. Ali, one of the creatives behind the project agreed to tell us the story behind the game’s inception, how it got made and what the team learned along the way. Read full post

su kacagi su kacagi paylas penis buyutucu hap geciktirici sprey